take the bull by the horns

take the bull by the horns,
also, grab the bull by the horns

Meaning

  • decisively deal with a difficult or dangerous situation
  • to deal with a problematic situation confidently
  • to handle a risky situation very bravely
  • deal decisively with a difficult problem

Example Sentences

  1. Jone decided to take the bull by the horns and organise things for himself.
  2. The British government will have to take the bull by the horns and tackle inflation.
  3. The administration decided to take the bull by the horns and solved the problem without any further delay.
  4. Just take the bull by the horns and strictly ask him to stop abusing.
  5. The captain took the bull by the horns to give his side a fighting chance of rescuing a point.
  6. Alex took the bull by the horns, sending the message that political resilience in the party has taken a back seat to power and positions.
  7. The opposition took the bull by the horns and, after lengthy discussions, decided to participate.
  8. The administration has grabbed the bull by the horns and carried out unprecedented top to bottom reforms.
  9. If you want to win, then go ahead and grab the bull by the horns.
  10. Leadership starts with a person’s capability to look in the mirror and grab the bull by the horns.

Origin

The saying undoubtedly originated in America, where it was a common but risky job to struggle with bulls. Controlling a bull was a part of rancher’s everyday working life throughout west America and often done for entertainment on festivals. To control a bull or a steer (a young bull), the cowhand would first catch it. Trying to grab the leg or neck of a dangerous animal like this was not a choice. The only solution was to take a deep breath and face the music straight by clutching the bull by the horns and then pulling it to the ground. This expression now means to challenge a problem directly without “beating about the bush.”

The earliest printed records of the phrase began to appear from the early 1700s.

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Example: Every relationship has its ups and downs. It is important to stick it out. Read on

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