pros and cons

pros and cons

Meaning

  • good points and bad points
  • advantages and disadvantages
  • the favourable and unfavourable factors or reasons
  • arguments for and against something

The phrase “pros and cons” is now generally used to mean the benefits and drawbacks of something. “Pros” refer to the benefits, while “cons” refer to the drawbacks.

Example Sentences

  1. There are pros and cons to having children.
  2. I’m weighing the pros and cons of moving to another state.
  3. The pros and cons of using a laptop for work are debatable.
  4. The pros and cons of taking a day off work are clear.
  5. There are pros and cons to every decision we make in life.
  6. Boxing came with many pros and cons in Muhammad Ali’s life.

Origin

The phrase “pros and cons” has been in use for at least a century. It comes from the Latin phrase “pros and contras,” which means “for and against”.

In Roman times, law cases were decided by a magistrate or judge after hearing arguments from both parties of an issue. The argument that stated more convincing reasons as to why the verdict should be “for” or “against” would usually win the case.

The phrase “pros and contras” is still used in some legal contexts today, such as when a judge is deciding whether to grant bail to a defendant. The pro argument for granting bail would be that the defendant is not a flight risk and will attend all future court hearings. The contra argument against granting bail would be that the defendant is a flight risk and might not attend future court hearings.

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Idiom of the Day

come to a pretty pass

Meaning: a bad situation

Example: Things have come to such a pretty pass that nowadays parents are afraid of advising their children. Read on

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