Idioms beginning with P

pound of flesh

Meaning: an unreasonable demand but something that is one's legal right.

Example: If you do not pay the amount of money, I have lent you by the agreed time, I will get a pound of flesh from you in return. Read on

pay as you go

Meaning: a payment system that allows you to pay right before a service you use rather than later.

Example: When it comes to mobile phone contracts, seven out of ten customers opt for pay-as-you-go plans. Read on

hit the panic button

Meaning: prepare for disaster

Example: Dad's fishing pole dove into the lake without warning, and he hit the panic button before jumping up with the reel-spinning like crazy in his hand. Read on

put cards on the table

Meaning: be open and honest

Example: When John met up with Jane on their first date, John laid his cards on the table for Jane to know what he wanted. Read on

play cat and mouse

Meaning: to play with or tease someone

Example: The cops do not like playing cat and mouse games with the culprits before catching them. Read on

pass the buck

Meaning: passing blame to another person

Example: That particular supervisor tends to pass the buck of all light duties to newly hired interns. Read on

put your foot in it

Meaning: say something (by mistake) that upsets, humiliates, or embarrasses someone

Example: Carla put her foot right in it when she congratulated her neighbour on being pregnant. It turns out she's not expecting but had just put on weight. Read on

part and parcel

Meaning: something that is a basic or essential element of the whole

Example: Darkness is part and parcel of the night. Read on

pour oil on troubled waters

Meaning: try to calm, soothe or placate a problematic situation

Example: She's such a calm person; last week, the whole office was in uproar until she stepped in and poured oil on troubled waters. Read on

pay lip service

Meaning: to agree by word of mouth only

Example: He paid lip service to the cause, but he hasn't lent a hand yet. Read on

Next Idioms ❯

Idiom of the Day

come to a pretty pass

Meaning: a bad situation

Example: Things have come to such a pretty pass that nowadays parents are afraid of advising their children. Read on

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