stand your ground

stand one’s ground
also, hold one’s ground

Meaning

  • not retreat
  • stay where you are when threatened
  • refuse to change your mind/opinion
  • to not to withdraw
  • relating to self-defence law (in the US)
  • a law or legal principle that permits a person to use fatal force in self-protection without first trying to retreat.

Example Sentences

  1. We stood our ground on the footpath, and then eventually, all the cows moved away.
  2. Moira’s son wanted her to move in with him after her husband died, but she held her ground and stayed where she was.
  3. The council wanted to widen the road, but the shop owners stood their ground, and they won in the end.
  4. The school bully came up to George and threatened him, but he held his ground even though he was petrified.
  5. Stand your ground and do not surrender on values or sovereignty.
  6. Humans need to stand their ground against Covid-19.
  7. If you see a bear coming towards you in Jungle, stop and hold your ground.
  8. Be receptive but also stand your ground – if you appear weak the other side will likely use this to their advantage.
  9. If people can intimidate you, they will. You’ve just got to stand your ground.
  10. The next time you answer a question in class, don’t be afraid to stand your ground, but stay calm and be willing to face opposition.

Origin

This phrase is in common usage throughout the west, as you can see above in terms related to having opposing opinions, standing up to some form of oppression or, staying put in one place.

Unfortunately, it has in recent history become notorious in the US as a ‘no duty to retreat law’ in up to 30 states. In these states, it can be used when there is a threat of lethal bodily harm or serious crime. If you wish to discover more on this side of the phrase’s history, please Google, Caroline Light ‘Stand your Ground.’

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H - S 2 Thoughts

2 Thoughts

If you are bullied, stand your ground and tell your teacher immediately.

- Jolene December 5, 2020

It’s better to be safe than sorry so that all the countries must stand their ground to control the Carbon emissions which affects the planet significantly.

- B Kaelian November 30, 2020

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be up on

Meaning: be well informed about a matter or subject

Example: If you want to start teaching English to grown-up kids, you need to be up on it else you're going to be unable to clarify their doubts. Read on

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